Coastal Community Capital Apply for a loan online today
5 Patti Page Way, Centerville, MA 02632
Mon - Fri      8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
508 790 2921

Business Terminology

Areturn to top

Appreciation

An increase in property value.

Acceleration

The right of the lender to demand payment on the outstanding balance of a loan.

Acceleration Clause

Condition in a mortgage that may require the balance of the loan to become due immediately, if regular mortgage payments are not made or for breach of other conditions of the mortgage.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgage (ARM)

A mortgage loan that does not have a fixed interest rate. During the life of the loan the interest rate will change based on the index rate. Also referred to as adjustable mortgage loans (AMLs) or variable-rate mortgages (VRMs).

Adjustment Period

This is the length of time for which the interest rate is fixed on an adjustable rate mortgage. After that period it will be adjusted. Typically once or twice a year depending on the index.

Affidavit

A signed, sworn statement made by the buyer or seller regarding the truth of information provided.

Amortization

A payment plan that enables you to reduce your debt gradually through monthly payments. The payments may be principal and interest, or interest-only. The monthly amount is based on the schedule for the entire term or length of the loan.

Annual Percentage Rate (APR)

A measure of the cost of credit, expressed as a yearly rate. It includes interest as well as other charges. Because all lenders, by federal law, follow the same rules to ensure the accuracy of the annual percentage rate, it provides consumers with a good basis for comparing the cost of loans, including mortgage plans. APR is a higher rate than the simple interest of the mortgage.

Appraisal

A document from a professional that gives an estimate of a property's fair market value based on the sales of comparable homes in the area and the features of a property; an appraisal is generally required by a lender before loan approval to ensure that the mortgage loan amount is not more than the value of the property.

Appraisal Fee

In order to prevent unnecessary costs and to ensure a quality appraisal of your property, we choose the appraisal firm that is used. The appraisal fee is a third party cost and reflects the level of detailed information and complex analysis required of a commercial appraisal, as opposed to a residential appraisal, which requires much less. We will order the appraisal once the upfront appraisal process fee is paid. The sooner you submit payment, the faster you'll get your money!

Assessed Value

The value that a public official has placed on any asset (used to determine taxes).

Assessments

The method of placing value on an asset for taxation purposes.

Assets

Any interest in real or personal property which can, if necessary, be appropriated for the repayment of debt.

Automatic Clearing House

Once your loan closes, your loan payments will be automatically debited from your account on a monthly basis using an automatic payment withdrawal (APW) service. The APW service is the most hassle-free way to set up your loan, eliminating the possibility of late or missed payments. If you waive this service, you will be charged a one-time $500 administrative fee at closing.

Breturn to top

Balance Sheet

A financial statement showing measures of the assets, liabilities and owner's equity or net worth of a business firm or nonprofit organization as of a specific moment in time.

Bankruptcy

A federal law whereby a person's assets are turned over to a trustee and used to pay off outstanding debts; this usually occurs when someone owes more than they have the ability to repay.

Broker

A licensed individual or firm that charges a fee to serve as the mediator between the buyer and seller. Mortgage brokers are individuals in the business of arranging funding or negotiating contracts for a client, but who does not loan the money. A real estate broker is someone who helps find a house.

Building Code

Based on agreed upon safety standards within a specific area, a building code is a regulation that determines the design, construction, and materials used in building.

Business Plan

A document that describes an organization's current status and plans for several years into the future. It generally projects future opportunities and maps the financial, operational and marketing strategies that will enable the organization to achieve its goals.

Buy Down

The seller pays an amount to the lender so the lender provides a lower rate and lower payments many times for an ARM. The seller may increase the sales price to cover the cost of the buy down.

Creturn to top

Callable Debt

A debt security whose issuer has the right to redeem the security at a specified price on or after a specified date, but prior to its stated final maturity.

Cap

A limit, such as one placed on an adjustable rate mortgage, on how much a monthly payment or interest rate can increase or decrease, either at each adjustment period or during the life of the mortgage. Payment caps do not limit the amount of interest the lender is earning, so they may cause negative amortization.

Capacity

The ability to make mortgage payments on time, dependant on assets and the amount of income each month after paying housing costs, debts and other obligations.

Capital

The money and other property of a corporation or other enterprise used in transacting its business.

Capital Gain

The profit received based on the difference of the original purchase price and the total sale price.

Capital Improvements

Property improvements that either will enhance the property value or will increase the useful life of the property.

Capital or Cash Reserves

An individual's savings, investments, or assets.

Cash Flow Financing

A short-term loan which provides additional cash to cover shortfalls in anticipation of future revenue, such as the payment of receivables.

Cash Reserves

A cash amount sometimes required of the buyer to be held in reserve in addition to the down payment and closing costs; the amount is determined by the lender.

Closing

The final step in property purchase where the title is transferred from the seller to the buyer. Closing occurs at a meeting between the buyer, seller, settlement agent, and other agents. At the closing the seller receives payment for the property. Also known as settlement.

Closing Costs

Fees for final property transfer not included in the price of the property. Typical closing costs include charges for the mortgage loan such as origination fees, discount points, appraisal fee, survey, title insurance, legal fees, real estate professional fees, prepayment of taxes and insurance, and real estate transfer taxes. A common estimate of a Buyer's closing costs is 2 to 4 percent of the purchase price of the home. A common estimate for Seller's closing costs is 3 to 9 percent.

Collateral

Assets pledged to secure the repayment of a loan.

Comparative Market Analysis (COMPS)

A property evaluation that determines property value by comparing similar properties sold within the last year.

Contingency

A clause in a purchase contract outlining conditions that must be fulfilled before the contract is executed. Both, buyer or seller may include contingencies in a contract, but both parties must accept the contingency.

Convertible ARM

An adjustable-rate mortgage that provides the borrower the ability to convert to a fixed-rate within a specified time.

Credit

An agreement that a person will borrow money and repay it to the lender over time.

Credit History

A record of an individual that lists all debts and the payment history for each. The report that is generated from the history is called a credit report. Lenders use this information to gauge a potential borrower's ability to repay a loan.

Credit Loss Ratio

The ratio of credit-related losses to the dollar amount of MBS outstanding and total mortgages owned by the corporation.

Credit Report

A report generated by the credit bureau that contains the borrower's credit history for the past seven years. Lenders use this information to determine if a loan will be granted.

Credit Risk

A term used to describe the possibility of default on a loan by a borrower.

Credit Score

A score calculated by using a person's credit report to determine the likelihood of a loan being repaid on time. Scores range from about 360 - 840: a lower score meaning a person is a higher risk, while a higher score means that there is less risk.

Creditor

The lending institution providing a loan or credit.

Creditworthiness

The way a lender measures the ability of a person to qualify and repay a loan.

Current Asset

An asset that will normally be turned into cash within a year.

Current Liability

A liability that will normally be repaid within a year.

Current Ratio

A measure of liquidity equal to current assets divided bycurrent liabilities. The higher the ratio, the greater the cushion between a company’s current obligations and its ability to meet them.

Dreturn to top

Debt

An amount owed for funds borrowed. It may be owed to an organization's own reserves, to private individuals, banks, or other institutions. Generally, the debt is secured by a note (see Promissory Note), bond, mortgage, or other instrument that states repayment and interest provisions. The note, in turn, may be secured by a lien against real or personal property or other assets.

Debt Ratio

A ratio that compares the total of all monthly debt payments (mortgage, real estate taxes and insurance, car loans, and other consumer loans) to gross monthly income.

Debt Security

A security that represents a loan from an investor to an issuer. The issuer in turn agrees to pay interest in addition to the principal amount borrowed.

Debt Service Coverage Ratio - (DSCR)

Property’s ability to pay its debt.  The Formula is: DSCR = Net Operating Income Divided by Principal and Interest Payment. (PITI)

Debt-to-Income Ratio

A comparison or ratio of gross income to housing and non-housing expenses; With the FHA, the-monthly mortgage payment should be no more than 29% of monthly gross income (before taxes) and the mortgage payment combined with non-housing debts should not exceed 41% of income.

Deductible

 The amount of cash payment that is made by the insured (the homeowner) to cover a portion of a damage or loss. Sometimes also called "out-of-pocket expenses." For example, out of a total damage claim of $1,000, the homeowner might pay a $250 deductible toward the loss, while the insurance company pays $750 toward the loss. Typically, the higher the deductible, the lower the cost of the policy.

Deed

A document that legally transfers ownership of property from one person to another. The deed is recorded on public record with the property description and the owner's signature. Also known as the title.

Deed-in-Lieu

To avoid foreclosure ("in lieu" of foreclosure), a deed is given to the lender to fulfill the obligation to repay the debt; this process does not allow the borrower to remain in the house but helps avoid the costs, time, and effort associated with foreclosure.

Default

The inability to make timely monthly mortgage payments or otherwise comply with mortgage terms. A loan is considered in default when payment has not been paid after 60 to 90 days. Once in default the lender can exercise legal rights defined in the contract to begin foreclosure proceedings

Delinquent

A debt that has become due and payable but remains overdue and unpaid.

Depreciation

A decrease in the value or price of a property due to changes in market conditions, wear and tear on the property, or other factors.

Disclosures

The release of relevant information about a property that may influence the final sale, especially if it represents defects or problems. "Full disclosure" usually refers to the responsibility of the seller to voluntarily provide all known information about the property. Some disclosures may be required by law, such as the federal requirement to warn of potential lead-based paint hazards in pre-1978 housing. A seller found to have knowingly lied about a defect may face legal penalties.

Down Payment

The portion of a home's purchase price that is paid in cash and is not part of the mortgage loan. This amount varies based on the loan type, but is determined by taking the difference of the sale price and the actual mortgage loan amount. Mortgage insurance is required when a down payment less than 20 percent is made.

Ereturn to top

Earnings Per Share (EPS)

A corporation's profit that is divided among each share of common stock. It is determined by taking the net earnings divided by the number of outstanding common stocks held. This is a way that a company reports profitability.

Easements

The legal rights that give someone other than the owner access to use property for a specific purpose. Easements may affect property values and are sometimes a part of the deed.

Encroachments

A structure that extends over the legal property line on to another individual's property. The property surveyor will note any encroachment on the lot survey done before property transfer. The person who owns the structure will be asked to remove it to prevent future problems.

Encumbrance

Anything that affects title to a property, such as loans, leases, easements, or restrictions.

Environmental Due Diligence

We perform an environmental due diligence on every commercial property that is being considered as collateral. This is to ensure that your property is free of any environmental issues that may delay or prevent the funding of your commercial loan.

Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA)

A federal law requiring lenders to make credit available equally without discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, marital status, or receipt of income from public assistance programs.

Equity

An owner's financial interest in a property; calculated by subtracting the amount still owed on the mortgage loon(s)from the fair market value of the property.

Escape Clause

A provision in a purchase contract that allows either party to cancel part or the entire contract if the other does not respond to changes to the sale within a set period. The most common use of the escape clause is if the buyer makes the purchase offer contingent on the sale of another house.

Escrow

Funds held in an account to be used by the lender to pay for home insurance and property taxes. The funds may also be held by a third party until contractual conditions are met and then paid out.

Escrow Account

A separate account into which the lender puts a portion of each monthly mortgage payment; an escrow account provides the funds needed for such expenses as property taxes, homeowners insurance, mortgage insurance, etc.

Estate

The ownership interest of a person in real property. The sum total of all property, real and personal, owned by a person.

Freturn to top

Fair Credit Reporting Act

Federal act to ensure that credit bureaus are fair and accurate protecting the individual's privacy rights enacted in 1971 and revised in October 1997.

Fair Market Value

The hypothetical price that a willing buyer and seller will agree upon when they are acting freely, carefully, and with complete knowledge of the situation.

FICO Score

FICO is an abbreviation for Fair Isaac Corporation and refers to a person's credit score based on credit history. Lenders and credit card companies use the number to decide if the person is likely to pay his or her bills. A credit score is evaluated using information from the three major credit bureaus and is usually between 300 and 850.

First Mortgage

The mortgage with first priority if the loan is not paid.

Fixed Expenses

Payments that do not vary from month to month.

Fixed-Rate

Payments that remain the same throughout the life of the loan because the interest rate and other terms are fixed and do not change.

Float

The act of allowing an interest rate and discount points to fluctuate with changes in the market.

Flood Insurance

Insurance that protects homeowners against losses from a flood; if a home is located in a flood plain, the lender will require flood insurance before approving a loan.

Forbearance

A lender may decide not to take legal action when a borrower is late in making a payment. Usually this occurs when a borrower sets up a plan that both sides agree will bring overdue mortgage payments up to date.

Foreclosure

A legal process in which mortgaged property is sold to pay the loan of the defaulting borrower. Foreclosure laws are based on the statutes of each state.

Greturn to top

Good Faith Estimate

An estimate of all closing fees including pre-paid and escrow items as well as lender charges; must be given to the borrower within three days after submission of a loan application.

Gross Income

Money earned before taxes and other deductions. Sometimes it may include income from self-employment, rental property, alimony, child support, public assistance payments, and retirement benefits.

Ireturn to top

Index

The measure of interest rate changes that the lender uses to decide how much the interest rate of an ARM will change over time. No one can be sure when an index rate will go up or down. If a lender bases interest rate adjustments on the average value of an index over time, your interest rate would not be as volatile. You should ask your lender how the index for any ARM you are considering has changed in recent years, and where it is reported.

Inquiry

A credit report request. Each time a credit application is completed or more credit is requested counts as an inquiry. A large number of inquiries on a credit report can sometimes make a credit score lower.

Insurance

Protection against a specific loss, such as fire, wind etc., over a period of time that is secured by the payment of a regularly scheduled premium.

Interest

A fee charged for the use of borrowing money.

Interest Rate

Since our commercial loan programs do not require any income verification, the interest rate reflects the increased risk associated with this type of loan. With both fixed and adjustable rate programs available, you're bound to find a payment to fit your budget.

Interest Rate

The amount of interest charged on a monthly loan payment, expressed as a percentage.

IRS Form 4506

Many commercial lenders are asking prospective mortgage applicants to sign IRS Form 4506 a "Request for Copy or Transcript of Tax Form" as part of the application process. Once signed, it serves as the lender’s springboard to receive copies of your tax return directly from the IRS for as far back as 4 years (or beyond).

Jreturn to top

Joint Tenancy (with Rights of Survivorship)

Two or more owners share equal ownership and rights to the property. If a joint owner dies, his or her share of the property passes to the other owners, without probate. In joint tenancy, ownership of the property cannot be willed to someone who is not a joint owner.

Judgment

A legal decision; when requiring debt repayment, a judgment may include a property lien that secures the creditor's claim by providing a collateral source.

Lreturn to top

Late Payment Charges

The penalty the homeowner must pay when a mortgage payment is made after the due date grace period.

Lease

A written agreement between a property owner and a tenant (resident) that stipulates the payment and conditions under which the tenant may occupy a home or apartment and states a specified period of time.

Lease Purchase (Lease Option)

Assists low to moderate income homebuyers in purchasing a home by allowing them to lease a home with an option to buy; the rent payment is made up of the monthly rental payment plus an additional amount that is credited to an account for use as a down payment.

Lender

A term referring to an person or company that makes loans for real estate purchases. Sometimes referred to as a loan officer or lender.

Lender Option Commitments

An agreement giving a lender the option to deliver loans or securities by a certain date at agreed upon terms.

Liabilities

Financial claims against an individual’s or firm's assets; amounts owed to creditors.

Liabilities

A person's financial obligations such as long-term / short-term debt, and other financial obligations to be paid.

Liability Insurance

Insurance coverage that protects against claims alleging a property owner's negligence or action resulted in bodily injury or damage to another person. It is normally included in homeowner's insurance policies.

Lien

A claim by one person on the property of another as security for money owed. Such claims may include obligations not met or satisfied, judgments, unpaid taxes, materials, or labor.

Lien

A legal claim against property that must be satisfied when the property is sold. A claim of money against a property, wherein the value of the property is used as security in repayment of a debt. Examples include a mechanic's lien, which might be for the unpaid cost of building supplies, or a tax lien for unpaid property taxes. A lien is a defect on the title and needs to be settled before transfer of ownership. A lien release is a written report of the settlement of a lien and is recorded in the public record as evidence of payment.

Lien Waiver

A document that releases a consumer (homeowner) from any further obligation for payment of a debt once it has been paid in full. Lien waivers typically are used by homeowners who hire a contractor to provide work and materials to prevent any subcontractors or suppliers of materials from filing a lien against the homeowner for nonpayment.

Line of Credit

An agreement by a financial institution such as a bank to extend credit up to a certain amount for a certain time to a specified borrower.

Liquid Asset

A cash asset or an asset that is easily converted into cash.

Liquidity

The quality of being readily convertible into cash.

Loan

Money borrowed that is usually repaid with interest.

Loan Acceleration

An acceleration clause in a loan document is a statement in a mortgage that gives the lender the right to demand payment of the entire outstanding balance if a monthly payment is missed.

Loan Fraud

Purposely giving incorrect information on a loan application in order to better qualify for a loan; may result in civil liability or criminal penalties.

Loan Officer

A representative of a lending or mortgage company who is responsible for soliciting homebuyers, qualifying and processing of loans. They may also be called lender, loan representative, account executive or loan rep.

Loan Origination Fee

A charge by the lender to cover the administrative costs of making the mortgage. This charge is paid at the closing and varies with the lender and type of loan. A loan origination fee of 1 to 2 percent of the mortgage amount is common.

Loan Term

Your loan is fully amortizing with a 15, 20, 25 or 30-year term. The advantage of a fully amortizing loan is that you will not be required to make a balloon payment at any point in the future. While many lenders structure their loans with balloon provisions, these terms can be very costly to borrowers because it forces them to seek new financing in the near future.

Loan to Value (LTV) Ratio

A percentage calculated by dividing the amount borrowed by the price or appraised value of the home to be purchased; the higher the LTV, the less cash a borrower is required to pay as down payment.

Loan-to-Value Ratio (LTV)

The relationship between the amount of the mortgage loan and the value of the real property expressed as a percentage. For purchase loans the value of the property is the appraised value or the purchase price, whichever is less. For refinance loans the value is the appraised value.

A LTV of 90% means that you can borrow a maximum of 90% of the property value.
   
Downpayment is the difference between the purchase price and the mortgage amount.

Lock-In

Since interest rates can change frequently, many lenders offer an interest rate lock-in that guarantees a specific interest rate if the loan is closed within a specific time.

Lock-in Period

The length of time that the lender has guaranteed a specific interest rate to a borrower.

Loss Mitigation

A process to avoid foreclosure; the lender tries to help a borrower who has been unable to make loan payments and is in danger of defaulting on his or her loan.

Mreturn to top

Maturity

The date when the principal balance of a loan becomes due and payable.

Mitigation

Term usually used to refer to various changes or improvements made on a property; for instance, to reduce the average level of radon.

Modification

When a lender agrees to modify the terms of a mortgage without refinancing the loan.

Mortgage

A lien on the property that secures the Promise to repay a loan. A security agreement between the lender and the buyer in which the property is collateral for the loan. The mortgage gives the lender the right to collect payment on the loan and to foreclose if the loan obligations are not met.

Mortgage Acceleration Clause

A clause allowing a lender, under certain circumstances, demand the entire balance of a loan is repaid in a lump sum. The acceleration clause is usually triggered if the home is sold, title to the property is changed, the loan is refinanced or the borrower defaults on a scheduled payment.

Mortgage Interest Deduction

The interest cost of a mortgage, which is a tax - deductible expense. The interest reduces the taxable income of taxpayers.

Mortgage Modification

A loss mitigation option that allows a borrower to refinance and/or extend the term of the mortgage loan and thus reduce the monthly payments.

Mortgage Note

A legal document obligating a borrower to repay a loan at a stated interest rate during a specified period; the agreement is secured by a mortgage that is recorded in the public records along with the deed.

Mortgagee

The lender in a mortgage agreement.

Mortgagor

The borrower in a mortgage agreement.

Nreturn to top

National Credit Repositories

Currently, there are three companies that maintain national credit - reporting databases. These are Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union, referred to as Credit Bureaus.

Negative Amortization

Amortization means that monthly payments are large enough to pay the interest and reduce the principal on your mortgage. Negative amortization occurs when the monthly payments do not cover all of the interest cost. The interest cost that isn't covered is added to the unpaid principal balance. This means that even after making many payments, you could owe more than you did at the beginning of the loan. Negative amortization can occur when an ARM has a payment cap that results in monthly payments not high enough to cover the interest due.

Net Income

Your take-home pay, the amount of money that you receive in your paycheck after taxes and deductions.

No Cash Out Refinance

A refinance of an existing loan only for the amount remaining on the mortgage. The borrower does not get any cash against the equity of the home. Also called a "rate and term refinance."

No Cost Loan

There are many variations of a no cost loan. Generally, it is a loan that does not charge for items such as title insurance, escrow fees, settlement fees, appraisal, recording fees or notary fees. It may also offer no points. This lessens the need for upfront cash during the buying process however no cost loans have a higher interest rate.

Nonperforming Asset

An asset such as a mortgage that is not currently accruing interest or which interest is not being paid.

Notary Public

A person who serves as a public official and certifies the authenticity of required signatures on a document by signing and stamping the document.

Note

A legal document obligating a borrower to repay a loan at a stated interest rate over a specified period of time.

Note Rate

The interest rate stated on a note.

Notice of Default

A formal written notice to a borrower that there is a default on a loan and that legal action is possible.

Oreturn to top

Offer

Indication by a potential buyer of a willingness to purchase a home at a specific price; generally put forth in writing.

Original Principal Balance

The total principal owed on a mortgage prior to any payments being made.

Origination

The process of preparing, submitting, and evaluating a loan application; generally includes a credit check, verification of employment, and a property appraisal.

Origination Fee

The charge for originating a loan; is usually calculated in the form of points and paid at closing. One point equals one percent of the loan amount. On a conventional loan, the loan origination fee is the number of points a borrower pays.

Owner Financing

A home purchase where the seller provides all or part of the financing, acting as a lender.

Owner's Policy

The insurance policy that protects the buyer from title defects.

Ownership

Ownership is documented by the deed to a property. The type or form of ownership is important if there is a change in the status of the owners or if the property changes ownership.

Preturn to top

Partial Payment

A payment that is less than the total amount owed on a monthly mortgage payment. Normally, lenders do not accept partial payments. The lender may make exceptions during times of difficulty. Contact your lender prior to the due date if a partial payment is needed.

Payment Due Date

Contract language specifying when payments are due on money borrowed. The due date is always indicated and means that the payment must be received on or before the specified date. Grace periods prior to assessing a late fee or additional interest do not eliminate the responsibility of making payments on time.

Personal Property

Any property that is not real property or attached to real property. For example furniture is not attached however a new light fixture would be considered attached and part of the real property.

Power of Attorney

A legal document that authorizes another person to act on your behalf. A power of attorney can grant complete authority or can be limited to certain acts or certain periods of time or both.

Pre-Approval

A lender commits to lend to a potential borrower a fixed loan amount based on a completed loan application, credit reports, debt, savings and has been reviewed by an underwriter. The commitment remains as long as the borrower still meets the qualification requirements at the time of purchase. This does not guaranty a loan until the property has passed inspections underwriting guidelines.

Pre-foreclosure Sale

A procedure in which the borrower is allowed to sell a property for an amount less than what is owed on it to avoid a foreclosure. This sale fully satisfies the borrower's debt.

Pre-Qualify

A lender informally determines the maximum amount an individual is eligible to borrow. This is not a guaranty of a loan.

Predictive Variables

The variables that are part of the formula comprising elements of a credit-scoring model. These variables are used to predict a borrower's future credit performance.

Premium

An amount paid on a regular schedule by a policyholder that maintains insurance coverage.

Prepayment

Payment of mortgage loan, or part of it, before due date. Mortgage agreements often restrict the right of prepayment either by limiting the amount that can be prepaid in any one year or charging a penalty for prepayment. Lenders who impose prepayment penalties will charge borrowers a fee if they wish to repay part or all of their loan in advance of the regular schedule.

Prepayment

Any amount paid to reduce the principal balance of a loan before the due date or payment in full of a mortgage. This can occur with the sale of the property, the pay off the loan in full, or a foreclosure. In each case, full payment occurs before the loan has been fully amortized.

Prepayment Penalty

A provision in some loans that charge a fee to a borrower who pays off a loan before it is due.

Principal

The amount of a loan from which interest is calculated.

Principal

The amount of money borrowed to buy a house or the amount of the loan that has not been paid back to the lender. This does not include the interest paid to borrow that money. The principal balance is the amount owed on a loan at any given time. It is the original loan amount minus the total repayments of principal made.

Promissory Note

Also known as a note; literally, a promise to pay. A written contract between a borrower and lender which is signed by the borrower and provides evidence of the borrower's indebtedness to the lender.

Promissory Note

A written promise to repay a specified amount over a specified period of time.

Property (Fixture and Non-Fixture)

In a real estate contract, the property is the land within the legally described boundaries and all permanent structures and fixtures. Ownership of the property confers the legal right to use the property as allowed within the law and within the restrictions of zoning or easements. Fixture property refers to those items permanently attached to the structure, such as carpeting or a ceiling fan, which transfers with the property.

Property Tax

A tax charged by local government and used to fund municipal services such as schools, police, or street maintenance. The amount of property tax is determined locally by a formula, usually based on a percent per $1,000 of assessed value of the property.

Public Record Information

Court records of events that are a matter of public interest such as credit, bankruptcy, foreclosure and tax liens. The presence of public record information on a credit report is regarded negatively by creditors.

Purchase Offer

A detailed, written document that makes an offer to purchase a property, and that may be amended several times in the process of negotiations. When signed by all parties involved in the sale, the purchase offer becomes a legally binding contract, sometimes called the Sales Contract.

Qreturn to top

Qualifying Ratios

Guidelines utilized by lenders to determine how much money a homebuyer is qualified to borrow. Lending guidelines typically include a maximum housing expense to income ratio and a maximum monthly expense to income ratio.

Quitclaim Deed

A deed transferring ownership of a property but does not make any guarantee of clear title.

Rreturn to top

Rate Cap

A limit on an ARM on how much the interest rate or mortgage payment may change. Rate caps limit how much the interest rates can rise or fall on the adjustment dates and over the life of the loan.

Rate Lock

A commitment by a lender to a borrower guaranteeing a specific interest rate over a period of time at a set cost.

Real Property

Land, including all the natural resources and permanent buildings on it.

Recorder

The public official who keeps records of transactions concerning real property. Sometimes known as a "Registrar of Deeds" or "County Clerk."

Recording

The recording in a registrar's office of an executed legal document. These include deeds, mortgages, satisfaction of a mortgage, or an extension of a mortgage making it a part of the public record.

Recording Fees

Charges for recording a deed with the appropriate government agency.

Refinancing

Paying off one loan by obtaining another; refinancing is generally done to secure better loan terms (like a lower interest rate).

Reinstatement Period

A phase of the foreclosure process where the homeowner has an opportunity to stop the foreclosure by paying money that is owed to the lender.

Remaining Balance

The amount of principal that has not yet been repaid.

Remaining Term

The original amortization term minus the number of payments that have been applied.

Repayment plan

An agreement between a lender and a delinquent borrower where the borrower agrees to make additional payments to pay down past due amounts while making regularly scheduled payments.

Right of First Refusal

A provision in an agreement that requires the owner of a property to give one party an opportunity to purchase or lease a property before it is offered for sale or lease to others.

Risk Scoring

An automated way to analyze a credit report verses a manual review. It takes into account late payments, outstanding debt, credit experience, and number of inquiries in an unbiased manner.

Sreturn to top

Sale Leaseback

When a seller deeds property to a buyer for a payment, and the buyer simultaneously leases the property back to the seller.

Second Mortgage

An additional mortgage on property. In case of a default the first mortgage must be paid before the second mortgage. Second loans are more risky for the lender and usually carry a higher interest rate.

Secured Loan

A loan backed by collateral such as property.

Security

A pledge made to secure the performance of a contract or the fulfillment of an obligation, such as the repayment of a loan. Examples of securities include real estate, equipment, stocks or a co-signer.

Security

The property that will be pledged as collateral for a loan.

Seller Take Back

An agreement where the owner of a property provides second mortgage financing. These are often combined with an assumed mortgage instead of a portion of the seller's equity.

Serious Delinquency

A mortgage that is 90 days or more past due.

Servicer

A business that collects mortgage payments from borrowers and manages the borrower's escrow accounts.

Servicing

The collection of mortgage payments from borrowers and related responsibilities of a loan servicer.

Setback

The distance between a property line and the area where building can take place. Setbacks are used to assure space between buildings and from roads for a many of purposes including drainage and utilities.

Settlement

Another name for closing.

Special Forbearance

A loss mitigation option where the lender arranges a revised repayment plan for the borrower that may include a temporary reduction or suspension of monthly loan payments.

Sub-Prime Loan

"B" Loan or "B" paper with FICO scores from 620 - 659. "C" Loan or "C" Paper with FICO scores typically from 580 to 619. An industry term used to describe loans with less stringent lending and underwriting terms and conditions. Due to the higher risk, sub-prime loans charge higher interest rates and fees.

Subordinate

To place in a rank of lesser importance or to make one claim secondary to another.

Survey

A property diagram that indicates legal boundaries, easements, encroachments, rights of way, improvement locations, etc. Surveys are conducted by licensed surveyors and are normally required by the lender in order to confirm that the property boundaries and features such as buildings, and easements are correctly described in the legal description of the property.

Treturn to top

Taxes and Insurance Escrows

An escrow account established to cover the taxes and insurance premiums due for the subject property.

Term

The maturity or length of time for final repayment of a loan, bond, sale or other contractual obligation.

Terms

The period of time and the interest rate agreed upon by the lender and the borrower to repay a loan.

Third Party Origination

A process by which a lender uses another party to completely or partially originate, process, underwrite, close, fund, or package the mortgages it plans to deliver to the secondary mortgage market.

Title

A legal document establishing the right of ownership and is recorded to make it part of the public record. Also known as a Deed.

Title Defect

An outstanding claim on a property that limits the ability to sell the property. Also referred to as a cloud on the title.

Title Search

A check of public records to be sure that the seller is the recognized owner of the real estate and that there are no unsettled liens or other claims against the property.

Transfer of Ownership

Any means by which ownership of a property changes hands. These include purchase of a property, assumption of mortgage debt, exchange of possession of a property via a land sales contract or any other land trust device.

Transfer Taxes

State and local taxes charged for the transfer of real estate. Usually equal to a percentage of the sales price.

Treasury Index

Can be used as the basis for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) It is based on the results of auctions that the U.S. Treasury holds for its Treasury bills and securities.

Trustee

A person who holds or controls property for the benefit of another.

Truth-in-Lending

A federal law obligating a lender to give full written disclosure of all fees, terms, and conditions associated with the loan initial period and then adjusts to another rate that lasts for the term of the loan.

Ureturn to top

Underwriting

The process of analyzing a loan application to determine the amount of risk involved in making the loan; it includes a review of the potential borrower's credit history and a judgment of the property value.

Vreturn to top

Variable Expenses

Costs or payments that may vary from month to month, for example, gasoline or food.

Variance

A special exemption of a zoning law to allow the property to be used in a manner different from an existing law.

Wreturn to top

Walk Through

The final inspection of a property being sold by the buyer to confirm that any contingencies specified in the purchase agreement such as repairs have been completed, fixture and non-fixture property is in place and confirm the electrical, mechanical, and plumbing systems are in working order.

Warranty Deed

A legal document that includes the guarantee the seller is the true owner of the property, has the right to sell the property and there are no claims against the property.

Write-Off

Refers to the action of a lender charging the outstanding amount of a defaulted or seriously delinquent and uncollectible loan as a business expense or loss; the bad debt itself.

Zreturn to top

Zoning

Local laws established to control the uses of land within a particular area. Zoning laws are used to separate residential land from areas of non-residential use, such as industry or businesses. Zoning ordinances include many provisions governing such things as type of structure, setbacks, lot size, and uses of a building.

Lending. Growth. Success.

"This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer"

Hosting • Design • Development: Community Internet Cape Cod SEO